1-800-donut:

crofethr:

denali-winter:

BAM.

I have never hit reblog so fast in my LIFE.

SHIT

(Source: sandandglass, via alrights)

libutron:

Fish of Baltic Sea
While the Baltic Sea might seem boring and mundane compared to tropical oceans, it has a fairly diverse and very odd assemblage of fish. It’s the world’s largest pool of brackish water, but it’s geologically so young, there are no specialized brackish water species.
So it’s a confusing mix. There are resilient ocean species, often smaller than their oceanic counterparts and unable to breed in some parts of the sea, and just as resilient freshwater fish venturing into the salty parts. Arctic fish mixed with temperate species coming from south. Oceanic fish that once invaded fresh waters and then returned here, now unable to tolerate full ocean salinity.
Fish that give birth, fish whose males get pregnant, fish whose eyes migrate over their heads during their lifetimes, fish that build nests, fish that smell like fresh cucumber. We have everything.
Made for Sieppo, a children’s magazine published by The Finnish Association for Nature Conservation.
Black markers and Photoshop imitating watercolor.
Text and illustration: Maija Karala

libutron:

Fish of Baltic Sea

While the Baltic Sea might seem boring and mundane compared to tropical oceans, it has a fairly diverse and very odd assemblage of fish. It’s the world’s largest pool of brackish water, but it’s geologically so young, there are no specialized brackish water species.

So it’s a confusing mix. There are resilient ocean species, often smaller than their oceanic counterparts and unable to breed in some parts of the sea, and just as resilient freshwater fish venturing into the salty parts. Arctic fish mixed with temperate species coming from south. Oceanic fish that once invaded fresh waters and then returned here, now unable to tolerate full ocean salinity.

Fish that give birth, fish whose males get pregnant, fish whose eyes migrate over their heads during their lifetimes, fish that build nests, fish that smell like fresh cucumber. We have everything.

Made for Sieppo, a children’s magazine published by The Finnish Association for Nature Conservation.

Black markers and Photoshop imitating watercolor.

Text and illustration: Maija Karala

(via scientificillustration)

fyeaheasterneurope:

Socks from Macedonia, made in the late 19th century.
(Source.)

fyeaheasterneurope:

Socks from Macedonia, made in the late 19th century.

(Source.)

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)
Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”
- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)

Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”

- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.

(via scientificillustration)

amodernmanifesto:

Can Geo-Engineering Save the Planet? - Christopher Williams on RAI (4/5)

Mr. Williams says how can you trust such an unpredictable massive change to the earth’s ecosystem, when the driving force will be to make a profit?

(Source: youtube.com)

Coffee makes me want to read entire pages the way I would normally read sentences.

If we came from babies, as these “scientists” would have you believe, then why are there still babies among us today?

I really like this.

(Source: fearknower1993, via dogmmunist)

I’m so absentminded, and I don’t know how to stop.

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists from the University of Wrocław discovered more than 150 graves belonging to a previously unknown culture in Peru. The find, dated to the 4th-7th century AD, indicates that the northern part of the Atacama Desert had been inhabited by a farming…